Sexism websites

13-Nov-2017 23:14

These issues are sometimes written off as feminists whining or seeking to silence men.

But there’s actually evidence that failing to address this type of online abuse can have serious consequences for users’ mental and physical health.

“For seven, eight, nine months, I was looking at this kind of stuff and thinking I was fine, but it was putting me in a really dark place.” In light of those issues, a trade group called the Online Safety and Technology Working Group released a report to Congress recommending that companies that employ people to moderate this content find ways to “address the psychological impact on employees of exposure to these disturbing images.” This is a problem in other professions where employees may routinely be exposed to disturbing content as part of their daily work, too.In response to one request, a developer started an email with the words “Okay, girls…”That’s when Gazin and Dwyer introduced a third cofounder: Keith Mann, an aptly named fictional character who could communicate with outsiders over email.“It was like night and day,” says Dwyer.“It would take me days to get a response, but Keith could not only get a response and a status update, but also be asked if he wanted anything else or if there was anything else that Keith needed help with.”Dwyer and Gazin continued to deploy Keith regularly when interacting with outsiders and found that the change in tone wasn’t just an anomaly.Earlier this year, they received a small investment from co-creator Justin Roiland and are working with him on creating some Witchsy-exclusive products.Gazin and Dwyer aren’t gunning for massive scale or fortune, but rather just want to offer a sustainable platform for artists to sell their work without censorship or too much extra noise. But along the way, Gazin and Dwyer had to come up with clever ways to overcome some of the more unexpected obstacles they faced.

“For seven, eight, nine months, I was looking at this kind of stuff and thinking I was fine, but it was putting me in a really dark place.” In light of those issues, a trade group called the Online Safety and Technology Working Group released a report to Congress recommending that companies that employ people to moderate this content find ways to “address the psychological impact on employees of exposure to these disturbing images.” This is a problem in other professions where employees may routinely be exposed to disturbing content as part of their daily work, too.

In response to one request, a developer started an email with the words “Okay, girls…”That’s when Gazin and Dwyer introduced a third cofounder: Keith Mann, an aptly named fictional character who could communicate with outsiders over email.“It was like night and day,” says Dwyer.

“It would take me days to get a response, but Keith could not only get a response and a status update, but also be asked if he wanted anything else or if there was anything else that Keith needed help with.”Dwyer and Gazin continued to deploy Keith regularly when interacting with outsiders and found that the change in tone wasn’t just an anomaly.

Earlier this year, they received a small investment from co-creator Justin Roiland and are working with him on creating some Witchsy-exclusive products.

Gazin and Dwyer aren’t gunning for massive scale or fortune, but rather just want to offer a sustainable platform for artists to sell their work without censorship or too much extra noise. But along the way, Gazin and Dwyer had to come up with clever ways to overcome some of the more unexpected obstacles they faced.

High-profile cases of sexual harassment in the VC world and the controversy over an ex-Google employee’s anti-diversity manifesto are just two of the most recent, notable storylines in the media.