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08-Dec-2017 09:08

The book consequently presents only Maitland's version of the song, which became the origin of all folk revival versions.

The song was first brought into the Folk Revival by Ewan Mac Coll, who learned it from Doerflinger's book and recorded it on the album A Sailor's Garland, produced by American folklorist Kenny Goldstein for the Prestige International label in 1962.

According to Library of Congress editor Stephen Winick, "The Leaving of Liverpool" was first collected by Doerflinger from Maitland, whose repertoire he recorded at Sailors' Snug Harbor in Staten Island from 1938 to 1940.

At the time, Doerflinger was an independent collector, recording the songs of sailors and lumbermen out of personal interest.

On his return, he ordered copies of his discs from the Library of Congress, but forgot that some of Tayluer's songs were on cylinders.

Therefore, he did not have these recordings available in preparing his book, Shantymen and Shantyboys, which was published in 1951.

The song's narrator laments his long sailing trip to California and the thought of leaving his loved ones (especially his "own true love"). The Leaving of Liverpool has been recorded by many popular folk singers and groups since the 1950s.

Finally, Tayluer is quite explicit in describing the work that was done by the men as they sang the song, making it unmistakably a sea shanty sung at the capstan, and this was duly noted by Doerflinger, who wrote "The Leaving of Liverpool (Capstan Shanty Version)" in his notes on the recording.

In early 1942, Doerflinger found another version sung by a retired sailor named Patrick Tayluer, who was living at the Seamen's Church Institute at the South Street Seaport in Manhattan.

This time, he borrowed equipment and blank discs from the Library of Congress with the understanding that he would deposit the recordings there.

The two versions are quite different, and the singers gave different accounts of the song.

Maitland said he learned "The Leaving of Liverpool" from a Liverpudlian on board the General Knox around 1885.

Finally, Tayluer is quite explicit in describing the work that was done by the men as they sang the song, making it unmistakably a sea shanty sung at the capstan, and this was duly noted by Doerflinger, who wrote "The Leaving of Liverpool (Capstan Shanty Version)" in his notes on the recording.In early 1942, Doerflinger found another version sung by a retired sailor named Patrick Tayluer, who was living at the Seamen's Church Institute at the South Street Seaport in Manhattan.This time, he borrowed equipment and blank discs from the Library of Congress with the understanding that he would deposit the recordings there.The two versions are quite different, and the singers gave different accounts of the song.Maitland said he learned "The Leaving of Liverpool" from a Liverpudlian on board the General Knox around 1885.Tayluer did not say exactly when he learned the song, but he was at sea by 1870, and Doerflinger generally thought his songs were older than Maitland's.